Wednesday, 28 January 2009

Questions for Root Ginger Exhibition's Jenny Wicks

Gingerism.com has secured an interview with Jenny Wicks, the creator of the upcoming exhibition entitled Root Ginger: A Study of Red Hair.

If you have a question you would like to ask Jenny, please add it in the comments and I will do my best to get it answered for you.

5 comments:

j-lo said...

Can you ask her for her number? Ginger birds are fiery!

1q1b said...

As an African American woman, I truly value my natural hair as it makes me feel connected to my ancestors. I made this choice a few years ago when I decided I’d rather leave it alone than to manipulate its state through perming, coloring, etc. Whether it’s in braids or an afro it’s like a badge of honor when I wear it in different styles that other hair textures could not pull off.

With this being said, I wanted to know what value (if any) do red heads place on their hair? I’ve heard many red heads were not comfortable with their hair color as kids, and as they grew older they just accepted it (not necessarily being proud of it). Is this true?

Thanks & please let me know when the interview happens.

http://1q1b.blogspot.com/

Anonymous said...

What a shame Jenny used a FAKE ginger for one of these photos....one of the girls used usually has dyed blond straight hair - and it's clearly been dyed for this photography exhibition - what a shame that Jenny couldn't have just used ALL natural gingers...

Anonymous said...

What a pile of shit I have Ginger hair and I find this well offensive. I've got a Question for Jenny would you do a photo study of Blacks Asians or Jews?

Jenny said...

The project is about the recessive gene: the genetic lottery we all play. What we carry within us that could impact on the lives of our children and our children's children in either a positive (hair colour) or negative (recessive gene diseases i.e cystic fibrosis/ sickle cell). Hence the reason why it was in support of the CF Trust. Red hair and CF are both in my family.
We are all dealt a random selection of cards (as it were) and recessive gene traits could be carried down through many generations without displaying themselves and then suddenly (what may seem to be quite randomly) appear.

So in answer to the offensive 'Anonymous' Feb 2010 - no, I'm not interested in doing a study of Blacks, Asians or Jews because they have nothing to do with recessive gene traits. I think you may be a little confused and perhaps should work out what your issue is.